Russian SU-18 SPH (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 83875 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian SU-18 SPH’.

Russian SU-18 SPH

History

In November 1929 ANII K.M. Ivanov, commissioned by the RKKA produced a of an self-propelled gun based on the T-18, as well as the ammunition carrier for it. The prototype was a captured French Renault FT-17BS.

The SU-18 kept the same design as the French vehicle, but replaced the turret with one that resembles a truncated pyramid. The SU-18 used the 76.2mm regimental gun model 1927 with a slotted muzzle brake to reduce rollback.

The decision to build the SU-18 was made on June 11 and stipulated the delivery of a prototype by October 10, 1930. However, due to the small ammunition capability and the limitations of the T-18 (a narrow gauge chassis and a high center of gravity) the design was abandoned in favor of larger and better self-propelled gun designs and further work on the SU-18 was stopped.

Source: HobbyBoss website

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German Bergepanzer IV, Recovery Vehicle (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 00389 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Bergepanzer IV, Recovery Vehicle’.

German Bergepanzer IV, Recovery Vehicle

History

The Panzer IV was the workhorse of the German tank corps, being produced and used in all theatres of combat throughout the war. The design was upgraded repeatedly to deal with the increasing threats from enemy forces.

Bergepanzer IV : A recovery vehicle, essentially a turretless Panzer IV chassis fitted with a crane. In May 1944 Bergepanzer 36 stared being built.

Source: Trumpeter website

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KV-220 Super Heavy Tank (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05553 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘KV-220 Super Heavy Tank’.

KV-220 Super Heavy Tank

History

KV-220 (Object 220) Experimental tank based on KV-1. Longer chassis (7 rollers per side). Armor – 100mm. New 850 hp V-2SN engine with turbocharging.

New diamond-shaped turret. 85mm F-30 cannon. One prototype was constructed in 1941. The tank was lost in battle.

The KV-220-2 had its turret removed (The turret and KV-220-2 were both used in the defense of Leningrad) it was fitted with a KV-1 turret and F-32 cannon. The tank was lost in battle, supposedly later repaired, and sent to a training unit.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

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German Panserkampfwagen IV, Ausf. E (Zvezda)

This is the Zvezda 3641 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panserkampfwagen IV, Ausf. E’.

German Panserkampfwagen IV, Ausf. E

History

The Panzerkampfwagen IV (PzKpfw IV), commonly known as the Panzer IV, was a German medium tank developed in the late 1930s and used extensively during the Second World War. Its ordnance inventory designation was Sd.Kfz. 161.

The Panzer IV was the most widely manufactured German tank and the second-most widely manufactured German armored fighting vehicle of the Second World War, with some 8,500 built.

The Panzer IV chassis was used as the base for many other fighting vehicles, including the Sturmgeschütz IV assault gun, Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer, the Wirbelwind self-propelled anti-aircraft gun, and the Brummbär self-propelled gun.

Source: Wikipedia

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Russian T-34/76, with mine roller (Zvezda)

This is the Zvezda 3580 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Tank T-34/76, with mine roller’.

Russian Tank T-34/76, with mine roller

History

Fighting with mine barriers became one of the major problems of the Red Army attacks during WWII.

The supreme command ordered urgently the development of a mine clearing device.

At that time the T-34 and its variants were the most widely used tanks in the Soviet Army. So it was logical to adapt the T-34 as carrier. This combination was then successfully in service through the whole WWII.

Source: Zvezda

Manufacturer

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Russian Tank T-34/76 (Zvezda)

This is the Zvezda 3535 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Tank T-34/76’.

Russian Tank T-34/76

History

The T-34 had well-sloped armour, a relatively powerful engine, and wide tracks.

The initial T-34 version had a powerful 76.2mm gun, and is often called the T-34/76.

The T-34/76, like many other contemporary tanks, had a two-man turret crew arrangement. This required the tank commander to aim and fire the gun while having to coordinate with other tanks and potentially also being a platoon commander, and proved to be inferior to the three-man (commander, gunner, and loader) turret crews of German Panzer III and Panzer IV tanks, which allowed the tank’s commander to concentrate solely on that job.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

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German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. D (MiniArt)

This is the MiniArt 35169 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. D’.

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. D

History

Panzer III was the common name of a medium tank that was developed in the 1930s by Germany and was used extensively in World War II.

The official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen III Sd.Kfz.141 (abbreviated Pz.Kpfw.III) translating as “armoured fighting vehicle”. It was intended to fight other armoured fighting vehicles and serve alongside the infantry support Panzer IV.

From 1942, the last version of Panzer III mounted the 7.5 cm KwK 37 L/24, better suited for infantry support. Production of the Panzer III ended in 1943. However, the Panzer III’s capable chassis provided hulls for the Sturmgeschütz III assault gun until the end of the war.

Source: Wikipedia

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German Flakpanzer IV, Wirbelwind (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 233-3000 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Flakpanzer IV Wirbelwind’.

German Flakpanzer IV Wirbelwind

History

The Flakpanzer IV “Wirbelwind” (Whirlwind in English) was a self-propelled anti-aircraft gun based on the Panzer IV tank. It was developed in 1944 as a successor to the earlier self-propelled anti-aircraft gun Möbelwagen.

The Panzer IV’s turret was removed and replaced with an open-top, nine-sided turret that housed a quadruple 2 cm Flakvierling 38 L/112.5. A closed-top design would have been preferable, but this was not possible due to the heavy smoke generated by the four anti-aircraft guns. The shape of the turret earned it the nickname Keksdose (“Biscuit Tin”).

The combination of armor and rapid fire from the four guns of the Wirbelwind made it very effective against lightly armoured ground targets such as trucks and armored cars; infantry were particularly vulnerable.

Source: Wikipedia

Where I got it

German 88mm Gun FlaK 36/37 (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 017-2800 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German 88mm Gun FlaK 36/37’.

German 88mm Gun FlaK 36/37

History

The 88mm gun (commonly called the eighty-eight) was a German anti-aircraft and anti-tank artillery gun from World War II. It was widely used by Germany throughout the war, and was one of the most recognized German weapons of that conflict. Development of the original models led to a wide variety of guns.

The name applies to a series of guns, the first one officially called the 8.8cm FlaK 18, the improved 8.8cm FlaK 36, and later the 8.8cm FlaK 37. FlaK is a contraction of German Flugzeugabwehrkanone meaning “aircraft-defense cannon”, the original purpose of the eighty-eight. In English, “flak” became a generic term for ground anti-aircraft fire. In informal German use, the guns were universally known as the Acht-acht (“eight-eight”).

The versatile carriage allowed the eighty-eight to be fired in a limited anti-tank mode when still on its wheels; it could be completely emplaced in only two-and-a-half minutes. Its successful use as an improvised anti-tank gun led to the development of a tank gun based upon it. These related guns served as the main armament of tanks such as the Tiger I: the 8.8cm KwK 36, with the “KwK” abbreviation standing for Kampfwagenkanone (literally “battle vehicle cannon”, or “tank cannon”).

Source: Wikipedia

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