JGSDF Type 90 Tank w/ammo-loading crew (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 260-4400 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘JGSDF Type 90 Tank w/ammo-loading crew’.

JGSDF Type 90 Tank w/ammo-loading crew

History

The Type 90 tank is the current main battle tank (MBT) of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF). It is built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and was designed as a replacement for all deployed Type 61s and a portion of their Type 74 tanks, and entered service in 1990. It is slated to be complemented by the Type 10.

The Type 90 mounts a licensed copy of the German Rheinmetall L44 120mm smoothbore cannon product by Japan Steel Works Limited. This is the same gun that is mounted on the German Leopard 2, American Abrams, and the South Korean K1A1 tanks. The gun is armed and loaded through a mechanical bustle autoloader (conveyor-belt type), developed by Mitsubishi of Japan.

The Type 90 tank is the first western tank to achieve manpower savings by reducing the crew to three through the development of the turret bustle autoloader (with the exception of the turretless Strv 103). This design allows the tank crew to operate without a loader, which allows the use of a smaller turret.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen III, Ausf. N (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 290-3600 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen III, Ausf. N’.

German Panzerkampfwagen III, Ausf. N

History

During the middles stages of WWII, most German military vehicles had trouble providing adequate support to troops, therefore the N type tank was built to help solve this problem. The N type tank replaced its Marder III main battery with a 7.5cm gun which could fire high-performance high-explosive bursting projectile shells.

From June 1942 through to August 1943, existing J, L, & M models also received these upgrades and 663 tanks were fitted, and another 37 were also upgraded later in 1944. In the summer of 1942 these tanks appeared on the battlefield with their highly explosive shells, and they proved to be highly efficient in their role of reinforcing the ground troops.

They were deployed into newly organized heavy tank battalions, to make up for the lack of Tiger I tanks. As a support tank, the N type was easy to manage and very reliable, and in the latter half of WWII it fought at many fronts.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian BT-7, Model 1937 (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35327-3800 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian BT-7, Model 1937’.

Russian BT-7, Model 1937

History

An Important Step in Russian Tank Evolution – The BT-7 was a highly-maneuverable tank with a powerful 45mm main gun in addition to sloped front armor, which made it the pillar of the Russian tank divisions.

The 1937 model was a defensive upgrade to its predecessors, featuring as it did sloped armor all around the body in place of the previous flat version.

This design proved to be successful enough for use in its successor, the T-34.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

American M10 Tank Destroyer (Mid production) (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 350-3800 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘US M10 Tank Destroyer (Mid production)’.

US M10 Tank Destroyer (Mid production)

History

This versatile AFV was developed largely to give U.S forces a potential counter to the German armor tactics which proved successful in the early stages of WWII.

It utilized the successful M4A2 Sherman chassis with diesel powerplant, and mounted the 76.2mm gun in an open-top rotating turret; the hull featured extensive use of sloped armor, kept thin so as not to hinder maneuverability. Bosses were used on the turret and hull to facilitate the affixation of additional armor.

Around 5,000 M10s were manufactured between September 1942 and December 1943, and it featured in action across North Africa and western Europe, its 3-inch gun and excellent maneuverability making it an asset for Allied forces.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Jerry Can Set (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 315 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Jerry Can set (Early type)’.

German Jerry Can set (Early type)

History

Essential Equipment for Early WWII German Vehicles – Jerry cans used by the German army featured a functional design. Early-type cans featured simple cross-shaped indentations for structural reinforcement while later types had more complex indentation patterns.

Early-type cans were seen from the Polish campaign to North Africa and the beginning of the Russian campaign, and some were continuously used until the latter half of the war.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

American M1A1 Abrams w/ Mine Plow (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 158-3400 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘US M1A1 Abrams w/ Mine Plow’.

US M1A1 Abrams w/ Mine Plow

History

Developed during the early 1980’s, the M1 Abrams tank benefited from the latest technological wonders of the time, giving it enormous advantage on any battlefield. The turret, being very angular and squat, had a very roomy interior. This angular design was combined with Chobham armor for excellent protection against the kinetic energy from hollow charge projectiles.

The hull sides and rear panels are vertical, with only the front angled to deflect anti-tank shots. The 1500 horsepower Avco-Lycoming AGT-1500 turbine engine provides remarkable speed and maneuverability plus being regarded as one of the quietest tank powerplants available today. During the mid 1980’s the M1 underwent an improvement program to upgrade its 105mm gun to the type M256 120mm smoothbore cannon.

The armor at the frontal area of the lower hull front and turret was also increased, and it was given the new designation of “M 1A1”. Other improvements are seen in the enlarged rear turret bustle stowage rack, a new style crosswind sensor, a revised gunner’s sightmount, plus reinforced suspension and transmission unit.

One of the more specialized pieces of equipment utilized on this tank is a detachable plow for uncovering and neutralizing mine fields. Land mines are a menacing problem for both humans and vehicles during any conflict, and the operations of this specialized M1A1 helped clear the way for troops following the tanks during the recent Gulf conflict.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian BT-7, Model 1935 (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 309-3800 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian BT-7, Model 1935’.

Russian BT-7, Model 1935

History

The Russian Fast Tank – The BT-7 was a Russian tank produced from 1935 which incorporated some design features from tanks developed by American engineer Walter Christie. “BT” stood for “Bystrokhodny Tank (Fast Tank)” and the tank featured an excellent maneuverability.

Equipped with a 47mm main gun, it was one of the better-armed tanks of that period and it also had sloped frontal armor, a feature that would make its way into later tanks such as the T-34.

BT-7s were first deployed during the Spanish Civil War and also took part in battles against German forces on the Eastern Front until enough T-34s became available to replace them.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

British Cromwell Cruiser Tank Mk.IV (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 221-3300 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘British Cromwell Cruiser Tank Mk.IV’.

British Cromwell Cruiser Tank Mk.IV

History

Tank, Cruiser, Cromwell (A27M), and the related Centaur (A27L) tank, were one of the most successful series of cruiser tanks fielded by Britain in the Second World War.

The Cromwell tank, named after the English Civil War leader Oliver Cromwell, was the first tank put into service by the British to combine a dual-purpose gun, high speed from the powerful and reliable Meteor engine, and reasonable armour, all in one balanced package.

Its design formed the basis of the Comet tank.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it