Track, Russian (Friulmodel)

Aside

Friulmodel

Aftermarket working metal track links for my Russian vehicles, in 1/35 scale.

Please verify the vendor’s website, before using the information below

Light/Medium

BT-7 ATL-74
T-34/76 ATL-38 ATL-124
T-26 ATL-45
T-28 ATL-91
T-54 ATL-01
T-55 ATL-01
T-62 ATL-01

Heavy

KV-1 ATL-10 ATL-51
KV-2 ATL-10 ATL-51
KV-8 ATL-10 ATL-51
KV-8S ATL-10 ATL-51
KV-85 ATL-10 ATL-51
KV-122 ATL-10 ATL-51
KV-1S ATL-10 ATL-51
JS-1 ATL-14 ATL-34 ATL-54
JS-2 ATL-14 ATL-34 ATL-54
JS-3 ATL-14 ATL-34 ATL-54
T-10 ATL-170

Self-propelled

SU-76/76M/76R ATL-96
SU-85 ATL-09
SU-85M ATL-09
SU-100 ATL-09
SU-122 ATL-09
SU-152 ATL-10 ATL-51
JSU-122 ATL-14 ATL-54
JSU-152 ATL-14 ATL-54

Source: Friulmodel

Russian BT-7, Model 1937 (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35327-3800 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian BT-7, Model 1937’.

Russian BT-7, Model 1937

History

An Important Step in Russian Tank Evolution – The BT-7 was a highly-maneuverable tank with a powerful 45mm main gun in addition to sloped front armor, which made it the pillar of the Russian tank divisions.

The 1937 model was a defensive upgrade to its predecessors, featuring as it did sloped armor all around the body in place of the previous flat version.

This design proved to be successful enough for use in its successor, the T-34.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian Tank Destroyer ISU-152 (Zvezda)

This is the Zvezda 3532 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Tank Destroyer ISU-152’.

Russian Tank Destroyer ISU-152

History

The ISU-152 marks its beginning on January 24, 1943. This was the moment of appearance of the first fighting vehicle of this family. It was designated Object 236 (Объект 236), using the same concept as the SU-152.

The Object 236 was completed in Factory No. 100 in Chelyabinsk, and on the same day, January 24, underwent trials on the Chebarkulski artillery range, 107 km from Chelyabinsk. By February 7, 1943 the trials were over, passed with success. On February 14 the vehicle was adopted and put on production under the KV-14 (КВ-14) designation.

In April 1943 was ordered KV-14 to be henceforth designated SU-152 (СУ-152). In time, the combat performance of SU-152, based on the KV-1S tank, made necessary the modernization of the vehicle, using the new IS tank as a base.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian BT-7, Model 1935 (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 309-3800 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian BT-7, Model 1935’.

Russian BT-7, Model 1935

History

The Russian Fast Tank – The BT-7 was a Russian tank produced from 1935 which incorporated some design features from tanks developed by American engineer Walter Christie. “BT” stood for “Bystrokhodny Tank (Fast Tank)” and the tank featured an excellent maneuverability.

Equipped with a 47mm main gun, it was one of the better-armed tanks of that period and it also had sloped frontal armor, a feature that would make its way into later tanks such as the T-34.

BT-7s were first deployed during the Spanish Civil War and also took part in battles against German forces on the Eastern Front until enough T-34s became available to replace them.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian SU-18 SPH (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 83875 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian SU-18 SPH’.

Russian SU-18 SPH

History

In November 1929 ANII K.M. Ivanov, commissioned by the RKKA produced a of an self-propelled gun based on the T-18, as well as the ammunition carrier for it. The prototype was a captured French Renault FT-17BS.

The SU-18 kept the same design as the French vehicle, but replaced the turret with one that resembles a truncated pyramid. The SU-18 used the 76.2mm regimental gun model 1927 with a slotted muzzle brake to reduce rollback.

The decision to build the SU-18 was made on June 11 and stipulated the delivery of a prototype by October 10, 1930. However, due to the small ammunition capability and the limitations of the T-18 (a narrow gauge chassis and a high center of gravity) the design was abandoned in favor of larger and better self-propelled gun designs and further work on the SU-18 was stopped.

Source: HobbyBoss website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

KV-220 Super Heavy Tank (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05553 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘KV-220 Super Heavy Tank’.

KV-220 Super Heavy Tank

History

KV-220 (Object 220) Experimental tank based on KV-1. Longer chassis (7 rollers per side). Armor – 100mm. New 850 hp V-2SN engine with turbocharging.

New diamond-shaped turret. 85mm F-30 cannon. One prototype was constructed in 1941. The tank was lost in battle.

The KV-220-2 had its turret removed (The turret and KV-220-2 were both used in the defense of Leningrad) it was fitted with a KV-1 turret and F-32 cannon. The tank was lost in battle, supposedly later repaired, and sent to a training unit.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian T-34/76, with mine roller (Zvezda)

This is the Zvezda 3580 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Tank T-34/76, with mine roller’.

Russian Tank T-34/76, with mine roller

History

Fighting with mine barriers became one of the major problems of the Red Army attacks during WWII.

The supreme command ordered urgently the development of a mine clearing device.

At that time the T-34 and its variants were the most widely used tanks in the Soviet Army. So it was logical to adapt the T-34 as carrier. This combination was then successfully in service through the whole WWII.

Source: Zvezda

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian Tank T-34/76 (Zvezda)

This is the Zvezda 3535 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Tank T-34/76’.

Russian Tank T-34/76

History

The T-34 had well-sloped armour, a relatively powerful engine, and wide tracks.

The initial T-34 version had a powerful 76.2mm gun, and is often called the T-34/76.

The T-34/76, like many other contemporary tanks, had a two-man turret crew arrangement. This required the tank commander to aim and fire the gun while having to coordinate with other tanks and potentially also being a platoon commander, and proved to be inferior to the three-man (commander, gunner, and loader) turret crews of German Panzer III and Panzer IV tanks, which allowed the tank’s commander to concentrate solely on that job.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian Project 704 SPH (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05575 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Project 704 SPH’.

Russian Project 704 SPH

History

One prototype, developed in 1945. It used elements of the IS-2 and IS-3 tanks. The overall height of the vehicle was reduced to 2240mm, which was compensated with an increased width of the superstructure.The factory designation was Object 704 (Объект 704). It was armed with the 152.4mm ML-20SM model 1944 (МЛ-20СМ обр. 1944 г) gun-howitzer, with a barrel length of over 4.5 meters (29.6 calibers) and no muzzle brake, which further increased the firepower of the gun. It had a maximum range of 13,000 meters.

The self-propelled gun carried 20 rounds of two piece (shell and charge) armor-piercing and high explosive ammunition. The secondary armament of the fighting vehicle consisted of two 12.7 x 108mm DShK machine guns, one anti-aircraft and one co-axial.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production) (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05589 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production)’.

Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production)

History

The Iosif Stalin tank (or IS tank, named after the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin), was a heavy tank developed by the Soviet Union during World War II. The tanks in the series are also sometimes called JS or ИС tanks.

The heavy tank was designed with thick armour to counter the German 88mm guns, and sported a main gun that was capable of defeating the German Tiger and Panther tanks. It was mainly a breakthrough tank, firing a heavy high-explosive shell that was useful against entrenchments and bunkers.

The IS-2 was put into service in April 1944, and was used as a spearhead in the Battle for Berlin by the Red Army in the final stage of the war.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer