German Wittmann’s Command Tiger I, Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.E (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6730 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Wittmann’s Command Tiger I, Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.E (Dragon)’.

German Wittmann's Command Tiger I, Pz.Kpfw.VI Ausf.E (Dragon)

History

Hauptsturmführer Michael Wittmann was one of Germany’s highest-scoring tank aces of WWII, with the credited destruction of 138 tanks and 132 anti-tank guns.

He cut his teeth on the Eastern Front with a StuG.III, and later he took command of a Tiger I in time for combat during Operation Citadel at Kursk in July 1943.

Source: Dragon website

Manufacturer

German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6352 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P)’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P)

History

The VK4501 (P), also known as the Tiger (P), was an unsuccessful heavy tank prototype produced by Porsche in Germany in 1942.

On the 21st May 1942, Henschel and Porsche at a meeting in Germany were asked to submit designs for a 45 ton heavy tank capable of mounting the high velocity 88mm KwK L/56 gun which was derived from the German 88mm FlaK gun. Both the Henschel and Porsche tanks were to be fitted with the same turret supplied by Krupp.

The Porsche company worked on updating the VK3001P medium tank, Porsche’s medium tank prototype, and adapted parts used on it for the new tank.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E (Late version) (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 146-4000 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Late version’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Late version

History

At the time of its introduction in 1942, the German Tiger I was the most powerful and sophisticated tank available anywhere in the world, and is still considered a weaponry masterpiece of that era. Most of the Tiger I’s were produced by Henschel, a heavy industry manufacturer in Germany. The later versions of the Tiger I went into production in January 1944, almost two and a half years after its debut. Many features like the thick armor plating, measuring up to 100mm in thickness at some areas, remaining unchanged.

Roadwheel improvements consisted of replacing the rubber rimmed roadwheels with new wheels that ran on steel rims, which were insulated from the hub by two rubber rings clamped between disc-shaped pressings. Changes made to the turret were: a commander’s cupola with seven vision ports, an anti-aircraft machine gun ring, and a side pivoting hatch; a loader’s hatch with periscope; the smoke exhaust outlet relocated to the center of the turret; and internally mounted “S” mine dischargers.

The 88mm KwK36(L/56) main gun was considered for replacement with the awesome KwK43(L/71) cannon, as used on the King Tiger, but was never accomplished. It has been said that one Tiger I tank was equal to five Sherman tanks on the battlefield and it was the most feared and respected of all German tanks during the conflict.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E (Italeri)

This is the Italeri 6471 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E

History

Tiger I is the common name of a German heavy tank developed in 1942 and used in World War II. The final official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger Ausf. E, often shortened to Tiger.

It was an answer to the unexpectedly impressive Soviet armour encountered in the initial months of the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, particularly the T-34 and the KV-1. The Tiger I gave the Wehrmacht its first tank mounting the 88mm gun, in its first armoured fighting vehicle-dedicated version, the (KwK 36).

During the course of the war, the Tiger I saw combat on all German battlefronts. It was usually deployed in independent tank battalions, which proved to be quite formidable.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E (Italeri)

This is the Italeri 0286 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E

History

The Tiger was certainly the most famous armored vehicle of World War II. Its fire power and protective armor made it the dominating factor on all battle fields during the years 1943-44. It did, however, present considerable problems, due to its complex mechanical construction.

The Tiger crews were continuously engaged in maintenance work, which was aggravated through extreme conditions in the African desert and the Russian Plains.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I (Early version) (Academy)

This is the Academy 13239 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I – Early version’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I – Early version

History

Tiger I is the common name of a German heavy tank developed in 1942 and used in World War II. The final official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger Ausf.E, often shortened to Tiger. It was an answer to the unexpectedly formidable Soviet armour encountered in the initial months of the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, particularly the T-34 and the KV-1.

The Tiger I design gave the Wehrmacht its first tank mounting the 88mm gun, in its initial armored fighting vehicle-dedicated version, which in its FlaK version had previously demonstrated its effectiveness against both air and ground targets.

During the course of the war, the Tiger I saw combat on all German battlefronts. It was usually deployed in independent tank battalions, which proved to be quite formidable.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I – Hybrid (Italeri)

This is the Italeri 6487 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I – Hybrid’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I - Hybrid

History

During the last years of the war, the Germans, to make up for their scarce production output, reconditioned vehicles that were worn-out by the war use.

Period photos show that at the moment of Germany’s defeat, many vehicles had been collected in factories, and were ready to be put back in operation by replacing worn-out or combat-damaged parts. Reliable sources confirm that the last Tigers to come out of assembly lines were reconstructed with salvaged materials: 54 hulls and 32 turrets of the first series, possibly from tanks used in training units.Their wheels were replaced by the latest, full-metal ones, and on some tanks the anti-magnetic “Zimmerit” paste was applied directly in the factory. These tanks were assigned to training schools to form new crews.

In the last weeks of war, they took part in the last engagements of the various Kampfgruppe (combat groups formed with units coming from different detachments) that were trying to stop the Allied units swarming over Germany from East and West.

Source: Italeri website

Manufacturer

German Sturmtiger, 38cm Assault Mortar (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 177-4100 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Sturmtiger, 38cm Assault Mortar’.

German Sturmtiger, 38cm Assault Mortar

History

A very rare variant of the much feared Tiger I heavy tank, was the “Sturmtiger” assault weapon that mounted a gigantic 38cm caliber mortar on the tank chassis. Development was initiated in August 1943 and was intended for uses against heavily fortified areas. The short barreled L/5.4, type RW61 mortar was originally developed by Rheinmetall-Borsig, for the German navy’s land-based protection against an enemy submarine attack.

In order to withstand the heavy recoil of up to 40 tons, the Tiger I’s sturdy chassis was selected. A decision was made to use only those chassis/hulls that were sent back from the front, so that new production of the tank would not be affected.

A fighting compartment was formed of a boxlike superstructure which was bolted to the lower hull itself. Its armor plate measured 150mm thick at the front and 80mm on the sides. Later, a steel ring counterweight was added to the mouth of the mortar barrel on some vehicles to make elevation aiming easier.

The mortar’s huge self propelled rocket projectile was 149cm long and weighed 330kg. For loading these heavy rockets aboard, a hand cranked crane was mounted to the right aft side of the upper hull. Due to the rocket’s size, storage space was very limited and only 14 shells could be carried.

Conversion production of the Sturmtiger began in August 1944, and by the end of December a total of 18 units had been completed and sent to the front for action during the final stage of the conflict.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf. E (Early version) (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 216-4000 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Early version’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E - Early version

History

It was the end of 1942 when a German heavy tank with extra thick armor and a powerful main gun first appeared on the North African front. The new tank, long-desired by the German soldiers who had hard-fought battles against the allies, became known as the Tiger I Ausf. E.

Development of the Tiger I began at the end of May 1941. The German Army Weapons Branch ordered the Henschel firm to vie with Porsche in producing a prototype. The first prototypes underwent trials on April 1942. The result of these and subsequent trial showed the superiority of the Henschel vehicle to the Porsche’s, and thus production orders were placed for it. The Henschel’s prototype had thick armor of 100mm at the front and 80mm on both sides, and the main gun was the then most potent, the 8.8cm KwK 36 L/56. The powerplant was Maybach’s HL 210 P45, yielding 650 horsepower.

Mass production started already in August 1942 with little alteration from the prototype. Starting from November 1942, air pre-cleaners were added on the rear hull plate. The mantlet was partly strengthened and “S” mine dischargers were fitted on five mounting points around the hull roof beginning from December. Moreover, a loader’s periscope was fitted from January 1943. The Tiger I produced from November 1942 to July 1943 featured these modifications, are referred to as the early production. About 200 units of these early production versions were produced.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it