German Super Heavy StuG E-100 (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 09542 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Super Heavy StuG E-100’.

German Super Heavy StuG E-100

History

What if Germany’s plans for a new series of tanks late in WWII had materialized?

The super heavy end of the Entwicklung (from German Entwicklung, “development”) E-series may have been represented by the E-100 tank chassis with ‘Maus’ type turret and two optional artillery guns, 15cm/L46 or 17cm PaK46.

Work on E-tanks was abandoned before the end of WWII.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

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German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. D/Tauch (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 80132 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. D/Tauch’.

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. D/Tauch

History

For “Operation Sealion”, the planned invasion of Britain, the Commander of the Army originally requested 180 underwater tanks. On August 1, 1940 there were 90 Panzer III tanks with 3.7cm KwK guns, 10 Panzer III with 5cm KwK and 28 Panzer IV ready for service. In addition, twelve Sturmgeschutz were available.

On August 19, 1940 there were 152 Panzer III and 48 Panzer IV in all ready for the four special Panzer units. After “Operation Sealion” was given up, the vehicles divided among Eutin, Putlos, Bremen and Hamburg were almost all assigned to the 18th Panzer Division.

The Tauchpanzer IV D were converted for the underwater version. Additional sealing was provided for the engine air-intakes, and the exhaust was fitting with non-return valves in place of the normal mufflers. The mantlet and MG mountings were all covered with waterproof fabric. The driver’s visor was made watertight by special metal cover with a visor block. An inflatable rubber tube was also used to seal the turret ring.

Source: HobbyBoss website

Manufacturer

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German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r) (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 00367 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r)’.

German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r)

History

Produce at the same time in the M1941 KV-1 type, the KV-2 (Also be called the year in M1941 KV-2 type) also threw in the production.

The KV-2 characteristic is its quick-fried tower shape. The quick-fried tower that equip 152 millimeters of howitzers reports the hexagon keeps the square form, resembling an enormous box.

One of the (sturm) Panzerkampfwagen KV-II 754(r) of Panzerkompanie(z.b.v) 66 with the commander’s cupola of a Panzerkampfwagen III G/IV EE and stowage racks for the 152mm ammunition on the rear hull.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. C (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 80130 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. C’.

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. C

History

The Panzerkampfwagen IV (Pz.Kpfw.IV), commonly known as the Panzer IV, was a German medium tank developed in the late 1930s and used extensively during the Second World War. Its ordnance inventory designation was Sd.Kfz.161.

Designed as an infantry-support tank, the Panzer IV was not originally intended to engage enemy armor — that function was performed by the lighter Panzer III. However, with the flaws of pre-war doctrine becoming apparent and in the face of Soviet T-34 tanks, the Panzer IV soon assumed the tank-fighting role of its increasingly obsolete cousin.

The most widely manufactured and deployed German tank of the Second World War, the Panzer IV was used as the base for many other fighting vehicles, including the Sturmgeschütz IV assault gun, Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer, the Wirbelwind self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon, and the Brummbär self-propelled gun.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

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German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. B (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 80131 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. B’.

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. B

History

The Panzerkampfwagen IV (Pz.Kpfw.IV), commonly known as the Panzer IV, was a German medium tank developed in the late 1930s and used extensively during the Second World War. Its ordnance inventory designation was Sd.Kfz.161.

Designed as an infantry-support tank, the Panzer IV was not originally intended to engage enemy armor — that function was performed by the lighter Panzer III. However, with the flaws of pre-war doctrine becoming apparent and in the face of Soviet T-34 tanks, the Panzer IV soon assumed the tank-fighting role of its increasingly obsolete cousin.

The most widely manufactured and deployed German tank of the Second World War, the Panzer IV was used as the base for many other fighting vehicles, including the Sturmgeschütz IV assault gun, Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer, the Wirbelwind self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon, and the Brummbär self-propelled gun.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

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German s.IG.33 auf Fahrgestell Pz.Kpfw.III (Sfl) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6713 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German s.IG.33 auf Fahrgestell Pz.Kpfw.III’.

German s.IG.33 auf Fahrgestell Pz.Kpfw.III

History

The s.IG.33 auf Fgst. Pz.Kpfw.III (Sfl) was a heavy infantry gun mounted on a StuG.III chassis. The Sturm-Infanteriegeschütz 33B featured a 15cm s.IG.33/1 gun in its boxy superstructure. Just 24 of these 21-tonne weapons were produced by Alkett from December 1941 onwards. They utilized a StuG.III Ausf.E or F/8 chassis.

Five crewmen operated this self-propelled gun that was used exclusively on the Eastern Front. Half fought in the bloody Battle of Stalingrad from October 1942 onwards, where their heavy guns could effectively demolish buildings in the bitter urban combat.

The remaining vehicles didn’t reach Stalingrad because the German 6th Army was encircled by that time, so instead they deployed with the 23rd Panzer Division.

Source: Dragon Models website

Manufacturer

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German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6352 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P)’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P)

History

The VK4501 (P), also known as the Tiger (P), was an unsuccessful heavy tank prototype produced by Porsche in Germany in 1942.

On the 21st May 1942, Henschel and Porsche at a meeting in Germany were asked to submit designs for a 45 ton heavy tank capable of mounting the high velocity 88mm KwK L/56 gun which was derived from the German 88mm FlaK gun. Both the Henschel and Porsche tanks were to be fitted with the same turret supplied by Krupp.

The Porsche company worked on updating the VK3001P medium tank, Porsche’s medium tank prototype, and adapted parts used on it for the new tank.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

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German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E (Late version) (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 146-4000 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Late version’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Late version

History

At the time of its introduction in 1942, the German Tiger I was the most powerful and sophisticated tank available anywhere in the world, and is still considered a weaponry masterpiece of that era. Most of the Tiger I’s were produced by Henschel, a heavy industry manufacturer in Germany. The later versions of the Tiger I went into production in January 1944, almost two and a half years after its debut. Many features like the thick armor plating, measuring up to 100mm in thickness at some areas, remaining unchanged.

Roadwheel improvements consisted of replacing the rubber rimmed roadwheels with new wheels that ran on steel rims, which were insulated from the hub by two rubber rings clamped between disc-shaped pressings. Changes made to the turret were: a commander’s cupola with seven vision ports, an anti-aircraft machine gun ring, and a side pivoting hatch; a loader’s hatch with periscope; the smoke exhaust outlet relocated to the center of the turret; and internally mounted “S” mine dischargers.

The 88mm KwK36(L/56) main gun was considered for replacement with the awesome KwK43(L/71) cannon, as used on the King Tiger, but was never accomplished. It has been said that one Tiger I tank was equal to five Sherman tanks on the battlefield and it was the most feared and respected of all German tanks during the conflict.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

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German Panzerkampfwagen IV, Ausf. D (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6265 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen IV, Ausf. D’.

German Panzerkampfwagen IV, Ausf. D

History

Well over 200 Panzer IV Ausf. D medium support tanks were produced between October 1939 and May 1941. These armored vehicles, armed with 7.5cm KwK37 L/24 guns, formed the backbone for early German military successes in France, the Balkans, North Africa and Russia.
Source: Dragon website

Manufacturer

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German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E (Italeri)

This is the Italeri 0286 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger Ausf. E

History

The Tiger was certainly the most famous armored vehicle of World War II. Its fire power and protective armor made it the dominating factor on all battle fields during the years 1943-44. It did, however, present considerable problems, due to its complex mechanical construction.

The Tiger crews were continuously engaged in maintenance work, which was aggravated through extreme conditions in the African desert and the Russian Plains.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

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German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I (Early version) (Academy)

This is the Academy 13239 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I – Early version’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I – Early version

History

Tiger I is the common name of a German heavy tank developed in 1942 and used in World War II. The final official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger Ausf.E, often shortened to Tiger. It was an answer to the unexpectedly formidable Soviet armour encountered in the initial months of the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, particularly the T-34 and the KV-1.

The Tiger I design gave the Wehrmacht its first tank mounting the 88mm gun, in its initial armored fighting vehicle-dedicated version, which in its FlaK version had previously demonstrated its effectiveness against both air and ground targets.

During the course of the war, the Tiger I saw combat on all German battlefronts. It was usually deployed in independent tank battalions, which proved to be quite formidable.

Source: Wikipedia

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German 15 cm s.IG.33 (Sf) auf Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf. B (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6259 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German 15cm s.IG.33 (Sf) auf Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf.B’, sometimes referred to as the Sturmpanzer I Bison.

German 15cm s.IG.33 (Sf) auf Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf.B

History

The Panzer I formed the nucleus of Germany’s embryonic tank formations, but its light armor and light armament meant it was outdated by the start of WWII. Despite being made redundant as a gun tank, the chassis of the Panzer I was utilized in a number of alternative roles, including that of a self-propelled howitzer.

It was recognized early on that mobile artillery could provide invaluable fire support to tank units, so the mounting of a 150mm s.IG.33 infantry gun resulted in a vehicle known as an s.IG.33 (Sf) auf Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf.B. The gun was mounted in a tall, boxy superstructure, though the chassis of the Panzer I was overstressed by the extra weight. The armored shield was only 10mm thick and could only offer front and side protection, plus there was no space for spare ammunition to be carried.

Ultimately, this ungainly and top-heavy artillery piece wasn’t a great success and only 38 were converted in February 1940 by Alkett. These guns served in the Battle of France and beyond, though as the war progressed, the 150mm s.IG.33 gun would be mounted on alternative chassis too.

Source: Dragon Models website

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