German Panzerkampfwagen III, Ausf. N (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 290-3600 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen III, Ausf. N’.

German Panzerkampfwagen III, Ausf. N

History

During the middles stages of WWII, most German military vehicles had trouble providing adequate support to troops, therefore the N type tank was built to help solve this problem. The N type tank replaced its Marder III main battery with a 7.5cm gun which could fire high-performance high-explosive bursting projectile shells.

From June 1942 through to August 1943, existing J, L, & M models also received these upgrades and 663 tanks were fitted, and another 37 were also upgraded later in 1944. In the summer of 1942 these tanks appeared on the battlefield with their highly explosive shells, and they proved to be highly efficient in their role of reinforcing the ground troops.

They were deployed into newly organized heavy tank battalions, to make up for the lack of Tiger I tanks. As a support tank, the N type was easy to manage and very reliable, and in the latter half of WWII it fought at many fronts.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. D (MiniArt)

This is the MiniArt 35169 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. D’.

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. D

History

Panzer III was the common name of a medium tank that was developed in the 1930s by Germany and was used extensively in World War II.

The official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen III Sd.Kfz.141 (abbreviated Pz.Kpfw.III) translating as “armoured fighting vehicle”. It was intended to fight other armoured fighting vehicles and serve alongside the infantry support Panzer IV.

From 1942, the last version of Panzer III mounted the 7.5 cm KwK 37 L/24, better suited for infantry support. Production of the Panzer III ended in 1943. However, the Panzer III’s capable chassis provided hulls for the Sturmgeschütz III assault gun until the end of the war.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Super Heavy StuG E-100 (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 09542 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Super Heavy StuG E-100’.

German Super Heavy StuG E-100

History

What if Germany’s plans for a new series of tanks late in WWII had materialized?

The super heavy end of the Entwicklung (from German Entwicklung, “development”) E-series may have been represented by the E-100 tank chassis with ‘Maus’ type turret and two optional artillery guns, 15cm/L46 or 17cm PaK46.

Work on E-tanks was abandoned before the end of WWII.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. D/Tauch (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 80132 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. D/Tauch’.

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. D/Tauch

History

For “Operation Sealion”, the planned invasion of Britain, the Commander of the Army originally requested 180 underwater tanks. On August 1, 1940 there were 90 Panzer III tanks with 3.7cm KwK guns, 10 Panzer III with 5cm KwK and 28 Panzer IV ready for service. In addition, twelve Sturmgeschutz were available.

On August 19, 1940 there were 152 Panzer III and 48 Panzer IV in all ready for the four special Panzer units. After “Operation Sealion” was given up, the vehicles divided among Eutin, Putlos, Bremen and Hamburg were almost all assigned to the 18th Panzer Division.

The Tauchpanzer IV D were converted for the underwater version. Additional sealing was provided for the engine air-intakes, and the exhaust was fitting with non-return valves in place of the normal mufflers. The mantlet and MG mountings were all covered with waterproof fabric. The driver’s visor was made watertight by special metal cover with a visor block. An inflatable rubber tube was also used to seal the turret ring.

Source: HobbyBoss website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r) (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 00367 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r)’.

German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r)

History

Produce at the same time in the M1941 KV-1 type, the KV-2 (Also be called the year in M1941 KV-2 type) also threw in the production.

The KV-2 characteristic is its quick-fried tower shape. The quick-fried tower that equip 152 millimeters of howitzers reports the hexagon keeps the square form, resembling an enormous box.

One of the (sturm) Panzerkampfwagen KV-II 754(r) of Panzerkompanie(z.b.v) 66 with the commander’s cupola of a Panzerkampfwagen III G/IV EE and stowage racks for the 152mm ammunition on the rear hull.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. C (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 80130 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. C’.

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. C

History

The Panzerkampfwagen IV (Pz.Kpfw.IV), commonly known as the Panzer IV, was a German medium tank developed in the late 1930s and used extensively during the Second World War. Its ordnance inventory designation was Sd.Kfz.161.

Designed as an infantry-support tank, the Panzer IV was not originally intended to engage enemy armor — that function was performed by the lighter Panzer III. However, with the flaws of pre-war doctrine becoming apparent and in the face of Soviet T-34 tanks, the Panzer IV soon assumed the tank-fighting role of its increasingly obsolete cousin.

The most widely manufactured and deployed German tank of the Second World War, the Panzer IV was used as the base for many other fighting vehicles, including the Sturmgeschütz IV assault gun, Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer, the Wirbelwind self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon, and the Brummbär self-propelled gun.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. B (HobbyBoss)

This is the HobbyBoss 80131 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. B’.

German Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf. B

History

The Panzerkampfwagen IV (Pz.Kpfw.IV), commonly known as the Panzer IV, was a German medium tank developed in the late 1930s and used extensively during the Second World War. Its ordnance inventory designation was Sd.Kfz.161.

Designed as an infantry-support tank, the Panzer IV was not originally intended to engage enemy armor — that function was performed by the lighter Panzer III. However, with the flaws of pre-war doctrine becoming apparent and in the face of Soviet T-34 tanks, the Panzer IV soon assumed the tank-fighting role of its increasingly obsolete cousin.

The most widely manufactured and deployed German tank of the Second World War, the Panzer IV was used as the base for many other fighting vehicles, including the Sturmgeschütz IV assault gun, Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer, the Wirbelwind self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon, and the Brummbär self-propelled gun.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. C (MiniArt)

This is the MiniArt 35162 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. C’.

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. C

History

The third vehicle in the development series, the Aust. C, was yet another attempt to improve the design of the suspension.

The Ausf. C still had eight road wheels on each side, with the first and last pairs on a short leaf spring, mounted parallel to the ground. The second and third pairs were supported by a longer leaf-spring assembly. Also featured were a servo-operated epicyclic clutch, brake steering and a new design for the drive sprocket and idler.

By 20 January 1938 there were only twenty-three Pz.Kpfw.III in the total Army Inventory. But this number had increased to forty-two by the end of March 1938. The Ausf. C saw action only in Poland. It was withdrawn from Panzer regiments in February 1940, before the start of the campaign in the West.

Source: MiniArt Website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German s.IG.33 auf Fahrgestell Pz.Kpfw.III (Sfl) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6713 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German s.IG.33 auf Fahrgestell Pz.Kpfw.III’.

German s.IG.33 auf Fahrgestell Pz.Kpfw.III

History

The s.IG.33 auf Fgst. Pz.Kpfw.III (Sfl) was a heavy infantry gun mounted on a StuG.III chassis. The Sturm-Infanteriegeschütz 33B featured a 15cm s.IG.33/1 gun in its boxy superstructure. Just 24 of these 21-tonne weapons were produced by Alkett from December 1941 onwards. They utilized a StuG.III Ausf.E or F/8 chassis.

Five crewmen operated this self-propelled gun that was used exclusively on the Eastern Front. Half fought in the bloody Battle of Stalingrad from October 1942 onwards, where their heavy guns could effectively demolish buildings in the bitter urban combat.

The remaining vehicles didn’t reach Stalingrad because the German 6th Army was encircled by that time, so instead they deployed with the 23rd Panzer Division.

Source: Dragon Models website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. B (MiniArt)

This is the MiniArt 35162 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. B’.

German Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf. B

History

The Ausf. В was the second attempt at a design solution for a tank in the 15-ton class. Only a small number of these design series vehicles were produced to provide a gun-armed Pz.Kpfw for training.

The design of the suspension of the Ausf. В was completely different from that of the Ausf. A. In place of the five road wheels with coil springs, the Ausf. В had eight road wheels per side, divided into pairs, with long leaf springs supporting a pair of road wheels at each end. Further improvements were made by increasing the number of return rollers to three, redesigning the cupola, and altering the rear deck and engine air louvres.

The Ausf. В were issued to Panzer units in 1937. After action in Poland, they were all removed from combatant units in February 1940 because of their unsatisfactory suspension and 15mm armour. In October 1940, the five Ausf. В Fahrgestell, which had been used for the experimental (0-Serie) series of the Sturmgeschütz, were returned to the Armoured troops and used as training vehicles.

Source: MiniArt Website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6352 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P)’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI (P)

History

The VK4501 (P), also known as the Tiger (P), was an unsuccessful heavy tank prototype produced by Porsche in Germany in 1942.

On the 21st May 1942, Henschel and Porsche at a meeting in Germany were asked to submit designs for a 45 ton heavy tank capable of mounting the high velocity 88mm KwK L/56 gun which was derived from the German 88mm FlaK gun. Both the Henschel and Porsche tanks were to be fitted with the same turret supplied by Krupp.

The Porsche company worked on updating the VK3001P medium tank, Porsche’s medium tank prototype, and adapted parts used on it for the new tank.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E (Late version) (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 146-4000 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Late version’.

German Panzerkampfwagen VI, Tiger I, Ausf E – Late version

History

At the time of its introduction in 1942, the German Tiger I was the most powerful and sophisticated tank available anywhere in the world, and is still considered a weaponry masterpiece of that era. Most of the Tiger I’s were produced by Henschel, a heavy industry manufacturer in Germany. The later versions of the Tiger I went into production in January 1944, almost two and a half years after its debut. Many features like the thick armor plating, measuring up to 100mm in thickness at some areas, remaining unchanged.

Roadwheel improvements consisted of replacing the rubber rimmed roadwheels with new wheels that ran on steel rims, which were insulated from the hub by two rubber rings clamped between disc-shaped pressings. Changes made to the turret were: a commander’s cupola with seven vision ports, an anti-aircraft machine gun ring, and a side pivoting hatch; a loader’s hatch with periscope; the smoke exhaust outlet relocated to the center of the turret; and internally mounted “S” mine dischargers.

The 88mm KwK36(L/56) main gun was considered for replacement with the awesome KwK43(L/71) cannon, as used on the King Tiger, but was never accomplished. It has been said that one Tiger I tank was equal to five Sherman tanks on the battlefield and it was the most feared and respected of all German tanks during the conflict.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it