German VK 4501 (P) (Italeri)

This is the Italeri 6565 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German VK 4501 (P).

German VK 4501 (P)

History

The German Army, during the Second World War, expressed the specific need to have available a heavy tank, characterized by an high protective armor and armed with a high velocity gun able to defeat every kind of enemy tank.

Ferdinand Porsche, to meet the request, developed the heavy tank VK 4501 (P) prototype. The tank introduced several innovative solutions for the time but not enough reliable. In fact, during the testing, the tank highlighted some weaknesses in the driving system and in the engine that didn’t permit to go ahead with the mass production.

The German Army preferred the Henschel prototype, the VK 4501 (H), which became the development base for the famous and lethal Tiger I. However, from the first production batch of the VK 4501 (P) Porsche released other versions as the new heavy Jagdpanzer “Ferdinand“ that mounted the longer 88mm. gun.

Source: Italeri website

Manufacturer

Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production) (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05589 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production)’.

Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production)

History

The Iosif Stalin tank (or IS tank, named after the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin), was a heavy tank developed by the Soviet Union during World War II. The tanks in the series are also sometimes called JS or ИС tanks.

The heavy tank was designed with thick armour to counter the German 88mm guns, and sported a main gun that was capable of defeating the German Tiger and Panther tanks. It was mainly a breakthrough tank, firing a heavy high-explosive shell that was useful against entrenchments and bunkers.

The IS-2 was put into service in April 1944, and was used as a spearhead in the Battle for Berlin by the Red Army in the final stage of the war.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Russian T-10A Heavy Tank (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05547 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian T-10A Heavy Tank’.

Russian T-10A Heavy Tank

History

The T-10 (also known as Object 730, IS-8, or IS-10) was a Soviet heavy tank of the Cold War, the final development of the IS tank series. During development, it was called IS-8 and IS-9. It was accepted into production in 1952 as the IS-10 (Iosif Stalin, Russian form of Joseph Stalin), but due to the political climate in the wake of Stalin’s death in 1953, it was renamed T-10.

The biggest differences from its direct ancestor, the IS-3, were a longer hull, seven pairs of road wheels instead of six, a larger turret mounting a new gun with fume extractor, an improved diesel engine, and increased armour. General performance was similar, although the T-10 could carry more ammunition.

T-10s (like the IS tanks they replaced) were deployed in independent tank regiments belonging to armies, and independent tank battalions belonging to divisions. These independent tank units could be attached to mechanized units, to support infantry operations and perform breakthroughs.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian JS-2 Heavy Tank (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05588 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian JS-2 Heavy Tank’.

Russian JS-2 Heavy Tank

History

The Iosif Stalin tank (or IS tank, named after the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin), was a heavy tank developed by the Soviet Union during World War II. The tanks in the series are also sometimes called JS or ИС tanks.

The heavy tank was designed with thick armour to counter the German 88mm guns, and sported a main gun that was capable of defeating the German Tiger and Panther tanks. It was mainly a breakthrough tank, firing a heavy high-explosive shell that was useful against entrenchments and bunkers.

The IS-2 was put into service in April 1944, and was used as a spearhead in the Battle for Berlin by the Red Army in the final stage of the war.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r) (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 00367 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r)’.

German Panzerkampfwagen, KV-2 754(r)

History

Produce at the same time in the M1941 KV-1 type, the KV-2 (Also be called the year in M1941 KV-2 type) also threw in the production.

The KV-2 characteristic is its quick-fried tower shape. The quick-fried tower that equip 152 millimeters of howitzers reports the hexagon keeps the square form, resembling an enormous box.

One of the (sturm) Panzerkampfwagen KV-II 754(r) of Panzerkompanie(z.b.v) 66 with the commander’s cupola of a Panzerkampfwagen III G/IV EE and stowage racks for the 152mm ammunition on the rear hull.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

German Geschützwagen Tiger für 17cm (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 00378 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Geschützwagen Tiger für 17cm’.

German Geschützwagen Tiger für 17cm

History

In 1942 Krupp started development on a heavy SP gun-carrier for the 17 cm Kanone or 21 cm Mörser by using Tiger automotive components like engine, transmission, steel road wheels and tracks.

Complete weight with an 8 men crew was about 60 tons, armor thickness was 30mm at the front and 16mm on the sides, a top speed of 45km/h on roads was possible.

The partly assembled prototype was found in 1945 by allied troops in Haustenbeck near Paderborn.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Russian Heavy Tank, KV-1 model 1939 (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 01561 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Heavy Tank, KV-1 model 1939’.

Russian Heavy Tank, KV-1 model 1939

History

The KV type tank that research to manufacture wins in the competition of the heavy type tank from the factory of Kirov in 1939, ising named after KV-1.

First material in KV-1 types L-11s 76.2mm of artillery; July of 1940, the heavy type in the series of KV tank production be transfered by the factory of Kirov the 100 factory production, henceforth the KV-1 that produce all changed to pack better types F-32s in function 76.2mm of artillery.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

  • Hobbymesse 2015

British Matilda MK.III/IV (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35 300 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘British Matilda MK.III/IV’.

British Matilda MK.III/IV

History

“Queen of the Desert” – The Matilda was developed as a heavily armored infantry tank and was the British Army’s main tank in North Africa during WWII.

The Matilda swept aside Italian opponents and was respectfully called the “Queen of the Desert” by German forces. During Operation Battleaxe to lift the siege of Tobruk in June 1941, German forces famously used their 88mm AA guns in the anti-tank role as they were the only effective counter against Matildas.

The Matilda has written her name into the history books as a highly effective tank which continually proved her worth during many fierce battles throughout North Africa.

Source: Tamiya Website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Self-Propelled Heavy Anti-Tank Gun Nashorn (Tamiya)

This is the Tamiya 35335 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Self-Propelled Heavy Anti-Tank Gun Nashorn’.

German Self-Propelled Heavy Anti-Tank Gun Nashorn

History

8.8cm of Destructive Power – The self-propelled heavy anti-tank gun Nashorn packed a formidable punch courtesy of a mammoth 71-caliber 8.8cm Pak43/1 gun which was one of the largest on the battlefield in WWII.

The vehicle was developed in all possible haste after the German Army had the unexpected surprise of meeting such overpowering opponents as the T34 and KV-1 upon its invasion of the Soviet Union. The recently-developed III/IV vehicle was used as a base for the Pak43/1 gun, which was capable of destroying enemy tanks from great distance. Top road speed was 42km/h thanks to its relatively light weight of 24 tons.

While deployment started in July 1943 under the moniker of Hornisse, it was given the new Nashorn designation from January of the next year, reportedly at the command of Hitler. 439 units were produced up to March 1945, and they served on both the Eastern and Western Fronts, providing heavy firepower for German forces.

Source: Tamiya website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian Heavy Tank, KV-8S (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 01572 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Heavy Tank KV-8S’.

Russian Heavy Tank KV-8S

History

A KV-1S fitted with the ATO-41 flame-thrower in the turret, beside a machine gun.In order to accommodate the new weapon, the 76.2mm gun was replaced with a smaller 45mm Gun M1932, though it was disguised to look like the standard 76mm.
Source: Trumpeter Website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian Heavy Tank JS-7 (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05586 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Heavy Tank JS-7’.

Russian Heavy Tank JS-7

History

In 1948, the IS-7 heavy tank was developed. Weighing 68 metric tons, thickly armoured and armed with a 130mm C-70 gun, it was the largest tank ever built by the USSR.

Although it was in many ways an innovative design, it was never accepted for mass production due to its cumbersome size and the very impractical layout of its fighting compartment

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

Russian Heavy Tank, KV-1S (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 01566 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian Heavy Tank, KV-1S’.

Russian Heavy Tank, KV-1S

History

KV-1S – A lighter variant of late 1942 with higher speed, but thinner armour. A new, smaller, cast turret and redesigned rear hull were used. 1370 were built.

In response to criticisms, the lighter KV-1S (Russian language: КВ-1С) was released, with thinner armour and a smaller, lower turret in order to reclaim some speed. Importantly, the KV-1S also had a commander’s cupola with all-around vision blocks, a first for a Soviet heavy tank.

However, the thinning-out of the armor called into question why the tank was being produced at all, when the T-34 could seemingly do everything the KV could do and much more cheaply. The Soviet heavy tank program was close to cancellation in mid-1943.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it