German VK 4501 (P) (Italeri)

This is the Italeri 6565 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German VK 4501 (P).

German VK 4501 (P)

History

The German Army, during the Second World War, expressed the specific need to have available a heavy tank, characterized by an high protective armor and armed with a high velocity gun able to defeat every kind of enemy tank.

Ferdinand Porsche, to meet the request, developed the heavy tank VK 4501 (P) prototype. The tank introduced several innovative solutions for the time but not enough reliable. In fact, during the testing, the tank highlighted some weaknesses in the driving system and in the engine that didn’t permit to go ahead with the mass production.

The German Army preferred the Henschel prototype, the VK 4501 (H), which became the development base for the famous and lethal Tiger I. However, from the first production batch of the VK 4501 (P) Porsche released other versions as the new heavy Jagdpanzer “Ferdinand“ that mounted the longer 88mm. gun.

Source: Italeri website

Manufacturer

Russian KV-7 Mod. 1941 (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 09503 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian KV-7 Mod. 1941’.

Russian KV-7 Mod. 1941

History

The Kliment Voroshilov (KV) tanks were a series of Soviet heavy tanks named after the Soviet defense commissar and politician Kliment Voroshilov and used by the Red Army during World War II.

The KV series were known for their heavy armour protection during the early part of the war, especially during the first year of the German invasion of the Soviet Union. In certain situations, even a single KV-1 or KV-2 supported by infantry was capable of halting the enemy’s onslaught.

German tanks at that time were rarely used in KV encounters as their armament was too poor to deal with the “Russischer Koloss” – “Russian Colossus”.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production) (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05589 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production)’.

Russian JS-2M Heavy Tank (Early production)

History

The Iosif Stalin tank (or IS tank, named after the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin), was a heavy tank developed by the Soviet Union during World War II. The tanks in the series are also sometimes called JS or ИС tanks.

The heavy tank was designed with thick armour to counter the German 88mm guns, and sported a main gun that was capable of defeating the German Tiger and Panther tanks. It was mainly a breakthrough tank, firing a heavy high-explosive shell that was useful against entrenchments and bunkers.

The IS-2 was put into service in April 1944, and was used as a spearhead in the Battle for Berlin by the Red Army in the final stage of the war.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

German 5cm PaK 38 auf Pz.Kpfw.II (Sf) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6721 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German 5cm PaK 38 auf Pz.Kpfw.II (Sf)’.

German 5cm PaK 38 auf Pz.Kpfw.II (Sf)

History

Conceived along the same lines as the Marder II, the 5cm PaK 38 was an expedient solution to mount the 50mm antitank gun on the Panzer II chassis.However, the much greater effectiveness of the 75 mm antitank gun made this option less desirable and it is not known how many field modifications were made to this effect.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

American M18 Hellcat (Academy)

This is the Academy 13255 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘American M18 Hellcat’.

American M18 Hellcat

History

The M18 Hellcat (officially designated the 76mm Gun Motor Carriage M18 or M18 GMC for short) was an American tank destroyer of World War II, used in the Italian, European, and Pacific theatres, and in the Korean War.

It was the fastest armored vehicle in the American defense inventory of the 20th century. The speed was attained by keeping armor to a minimum, no more than one inch thick and roofless, open-top turrets (a standard design feature for all American fully tracked tank destroyers of World War II) and by powering the relatively small vehicle with a radial engine originally designed for aircraft usage.

The Hellcat, along with the M4 Sherman-based M10 tank destroyer and the highly effective, 90mm gun-armed M36 tank destroyer, provided American and Allied forces with a respectable mobile anti-tank capability against the newer German armored types.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

Russian SU-122, Interior Kit (Initial Production) (MiniArt)

This is the MiniArt 35175 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian SU-122 Initial Production, Interior Kit’.

Russian SU-122 Initial Production, Interior Kit

History

The Russian SU-122 self-propelled howitzer was created in November 1942 at the design bureau of UZTM (Uralmashzavod – Uralsky Machine Building factory).

The vehicle was based on the T-44 medium tank chassis and was a Russian self-propelled howitzer or assault gun used during World War II.

The machine was designed to destroy fortifications, gun emplacements and tanks.

Source: MiniArt website

Manufacturer

German Radio Communication Truck, Krupp L3H 163 (ICM)

This is the ICM 35462 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Radio Communication Truck, Krupp L3H 163’.

German Radio Communication Truck, Krupp L3H 163

The once more improved model Krupp L3H 163 – which was propelled by the strengthened M 12 engine with 110 HP – was manufactured from 1936 to 1938.

Typical for the Funkbetriebskraftwagen – radio operating motor vehicle (Kfz.72) were the two windows on both sides of the box body and two radio masts on the rear of the box body.

Two Auffahrbohlen – supporting planks – were mounted on the left side of the box body while the eight rods of the 10m Steckmast – radio mast – were stored in special mountings on the right side.

Source: Kfz der Whermacht website

Manufacturer

German Light Truck, Opel Blitz 2,5 32 (ICM)

This is the ICM 35401 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Light Truck, Opel Blitz 2,5 32’.

German Light Truck, Opel Blitz 2,5 32

Only 698 exemplars of the one and a half ton model of the new Opel Blitz were made from December 1930 to June 1931.

The vehicle was propelled by a 40 HP four-cylinder engine with a cylinder capacity of 2594 ccm.

Some vehicles of this type were procured by the Reichswehr with Krankenkraftwagen (Kfz.31) – ambulance – car bodies. These were taken over by the Wehrmacht, later.

Source: Kfz der Whermacht website

Manufacturer

German Truck, Mercedes-Benz LG3000 (ICM)

This is the ICM 35405 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Truck, Mercedes-Benz LG3000’.

German Truck, Mercedes-Benz LG3000

At first, Daimler-Benz was not involved in the development of any three-axle cross-country lorry in the 3 ton class. Generally, Daimler-Benz maintained to be present in all relevant motor vehicle classes. Therefore, an own three-axle cross-country lorry of the 3 ton class was developed beginning in 1934.

This type was designated Mercedes-Benz LG63. The first three testing vehicles were finished already in 1934. In 1935, further seven vehicles followed. In this time, rearmament of the German army was started in larger scales. The result was, that the so far accepted companies could not produce the demanded quantities of cross-country lorries in the 3 ton class.

Finally, the Wehrmacht took notice of the Mercedes-Bent LG63. Serial production of the vehicle, now designated Mercedes-Benz LG3000, started in 1936.

Source: Kfz der Whermacht website

Manufacturer

German Truck, Ford V3000S (1941 production) (ICM)

This is the ICM 35411 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Truck, Ford V3000S – 1941 production’.

German Truck, Ford V3000S - 1941 production

Approximately 25,000 units of the successor model of the Ford 3 ton lorry model 1939 were manufactured from 1942 to 1945. It differed from the American Ford 3 ton model 1940 by its one piece windshield.

The Ford 3 ton model 1941 was made with four-cylinder engine (G188T) and with a V8 engine (G198TS). The model G198TS was designated V3000S by the Wehrmacht.

The sales designation of the G188T was B3000. The four-cylinder model, which was exclusively made for the civilian market, was also offered with wood-gas drive (G188TG).

Source: Kfz der Whermacht website

Manufacturer

German Truck, Krupp L3H 163 (ICM)

This is the ICM 35461 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Truck, Krupp L3H 163’.

German Truck, Krupp L3H 163

The once more improved model Krupp L3H 163 – which was propelled by the strengthened M 12 engine with 110 HP – was manufactured from 1936 to 1938.

Besides the stronger engine, the Krupp L3H 163 had the Knorr pneumatic braking system as standard, an improved shifting gear and improved wheel suspensions.

The most striking new feature was the new bumper made of angled steel sections which replaced the different bumpers made of steel tubes. During serial production, the Simplex rims were replaced by new developed Trilex rims.

Source: Kfz der Whermacht website

Manufacturer

German Radio Communication Truck, Henschel 33 D1 (ICM)

This is the ICM 35467 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Radio Communication Truck, Henschel 33 D1’.
German Radio Communication Truck, Henschel 33 D1

In the course of the first program for motorising the Reichswehr from 1926, development of three-axled cross-country lorries with a payload of 3 tons was demanded besides others.

Three companies were involved in the development: Büssing, Henschel and Krupp. The first Henschel model – the Henschel type 33 B1 – was delivered in 1928. The vehicles delivered to the Reichswehr had spoke rims with three spokes and dual tyres on the rear axles. In 1929, the Henschel type 33 D1 with the stronger D engine entered serial production.

Compared to the Henschel type 33 B1, the Henschel type 33 D1 had a longer engine bonnet.

Source: Kfz der Whermacht website

Manufacturer