German Schwere Plattformwagen Type SSMYS 80 ton (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 00221 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Schwere Plattformwagen Type SSMYS 80 ton’.

German Schwere Plattformwagen Type SSMYS 80 ton

History

During WWII, the SSMYS 80ton vast railroads in Europe and Russia were used to carry military items closer to the front.

In the case of tanks, this got them closer to the battlefield faster than if they had been driven there under their own power. It also left the tank crews fresher for battle.

This particular SSYMS 80 ton, was used for carrying the Germany Panther and Tiger heavy tank.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Russian SU-152, Late version (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05568 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘Russian SU-152, Late version’.

Russian SU-152, Late version

History

The SU-152 (СУ-152) was a Soviet self-propelled heavy howitzer used during World War II. It mounted a 152mm gun-howitzer on the chassis of a KV-1S heavy tank.

Later production used IS tank chassis and was re-designated as ISU-152. Because of its adopted role of as an impromptu heavy tank destroyer, capable of knocking out the heaviest German armoured vehicles — Tiger, Panther and Elefant tank destroyers—it was nicknamed Zveroboy, “beast killer”.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

German 2cm Flakvierling 38 (Bronco)

This is the Bronco 35057 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German 2cm Flakvierling 38’.

German 2cm Flakvierling 38

History

The 2cm FlaK 38 was a variant of the earlier FlaK 30 naval gun developed by Rheinmetall-Borsig from the Swiss Solothurn ST-5. The FlaK 38 was to have a greater rate of fire with improved ammunition feeding, though the 20-round box magazine was retained. The rate of fire (practical) was raised from 120 rpm to 220 rpm, while the overall weight of the weapon was lowered. With a muzzle velocity of 900 m/s, the FlaK 38 had a range of 2,200 meters.

In 1940 the 2cm Flakvierling (quad mounting) 38 was officially adopted by the German army as its standard light anti-aircraft weapon. Mauser was made responsible for the development work and subsequent production of this variant. All four guns could be fired with a combined rate of fire of 800 rpm, or the weapons could be fired in pairs.

During the war it was used either vehicle mounted or on its familiar 4-gun Sd.Ah.52 towed carriage. As the war progressed, ammunition was developed for ground use against vehicles and ground works.

Source: Bronco website

Manufacturer

German Railway Gondola (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 01517 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Railway Gondola’.

German Railway Gondola

History

The Heavy Cargo Cars (Schwereer Feldbahnwagen) were often seen with troops in transport. The cargo transported can be what ever you mighe imagine they might have carried. MG-clamp mounts were usually fastened to the sides and the sides gave some protection for the troops in transport.
Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Railway Gondola – Lower sides (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 01518 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Railway Gondola – Lower sides’.

German Railway Gondola - Lower sides

History

The Deutche Reichsbahn was pushed into service when the German Army began to move mass amounts of troops and machinery. The Light Cargo (Leichter Feldbahnwagen) was used to carry anything and everything including light armor.

Half tracks, soft skin vehicles and light armor like the Marter III were seen on these cars. They were used throughout the span of the war. These cars were often sand bagged and used with AA units for Air cover.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it

German Telemeter KDO Mod 40 (Bronco)

This is the Bronco 35103 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Telemeter KDO Mod 40’.

German Telemeter KDO Mod 40

History

The Kommandogerät 40 was a director used principally for large anti-aircraft guns, such as the 8.8cm FlaK 36 or the 10.5cm FlaK 40.

Introduced by the German military in 1941 this small director was used by all three services and could be modified for use with almost any anti-aircraft weapon. In the field the director used a 5-man crew, two men are required to input azimuth and elevation data. A third man sets the slant range by means of a 4-meter stereo range finder which is mounted on top of the director. A fourth man sets the horizontal angle of approach, while the fifth man is a general operator. The time from first acquiring the target to firing the first round could be achieved in less than 30 seconds. The slant range could be up to 18,000 meters.

For transport the director is mounted on a Sd.Ah.52 special trailer, equipped with lifting devices, and towed by a light truck.

Source: Bronco Website

Manufacturer

German Sd.Kfz.165 Hummel (Late Production) (Dragon)

This is the Dragon 6321 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German Sd.Kfz.165 Hummel – Late Production’.

German Sd.Kfz.165 Hummel – Late Production

History

Hummel (German: “bumblebee”) was a self-propelled artillery gun based on the Geschützwagen III/IV chassis, armed with a 15 cm howitzer. It was used by the German Wehrmacht during the Second World War from early 1943 until the end of the war.

The full designation was Panzerfeldhaubitze 18M auf Geschützwagen III/IV (Sf) Hummel, Sd.Kfz.165. On February 27, 1944, Hitler ordered the name Hummel to be dropped as being inappropriate for a fighting vehicle.

Source: Wikipedia

Manufacturer

German 8.8 cm PAK-43 Waffenträger (Trumpeter)

This is the Trumpeter 05550 kit in 1/35 scale, of the ‘German 8.8cm PAK-43 Waffenträger’.

German 8.8 cm PAK-43 Waffenträger

History

On 19 April 1944 Krupp representatives visited Ardeltwerke in Eberwalde to discuss the design of the 8.8 cm PAK 43 Kp auf Waffenträger. Ardelt was sent a second PAK 43 from series production. The Waffenträger with this gun presented a significant improvement and was completely satisfactory in firing and driving trials.

During the meeting on development and production on 9 January 1945, the status of the Waffenträger 8.8 cm PaK 43 was reported as: In spite of using couriers to deliver suspension parts, only 2 are expected to be completed by 31 December 1944.

All means will be used in an attempt to obtain all of the suspension parts by the end of December. If this is achieved, a further 19 should be completed by 15 January 1945.

Source: Trumpeter website

Manufacturer

Where I got it